THE GREEN EXHAUST CONCEPT

DEVELOPMENT
Development of a pressure-based condensation heat exchanger that is a modular add-on attachment between the last turbine and the core nozzle of an aero-engine

TECHNOLOGY POTENTIAL
Technology potential of the first generation of contrail-free aero-engines in an environment-friendly aircraft configuration that recovers water as a net positive product

CONFORM
Conform to future environmental regulations for aviation on greenhouse emissions and contrail formation

CONTAINMENT AND COLLECTION
Containment and collection of the contrail forming water vapour as liquid water within the engine while releasing a cleaner exhaust into the atmosphere

EXTRACTED WATER UTILITY
Extracted water utility for on board aircraft and engine use as well as to be released at lower altitudes as liquid water and artificial rainfall

SYNERGISTIC TECHNOLOGY
Synergy with existing framework of engine design of turbomachinery and no engine modification or redesign is required since a modular solution is offered to the aero-engine manufacturers

THERMOCHEMISTRY OF COMBUSTION GASES

ENVIRONMENTAL TRADE-OFF

In a high bypass turbofan engine, the water vapor content of the core exhaust is 2.25 %. Water extraction results in a reduction in the core exhaust mass flow by the same amount. The water produced displaces an equal volume of fuel. 1.0715 kg/s of fuel is consumed by a single standard three-spool turbofan engine during cruise flight. The emission index of water for kerosene fuel is 1.25 and the fuel-air ratio at cruise is 1:52. Hence, 1.34 kg/s of water is produced by a single standard three-spool high bypass turbofan engine during cruise flight which implies that almost 40,000 kg of water is produced per engine. This amounts to nearly 160,000 kg of water being produced during a transatlantic flight on a large passenger aircraft with four engines on board.